165th Airlift Wing, Georgia ANG   Right Corner Banner
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The 165th Airlift Wing began its proud history on 12 October 1946 at Travis Field (Chatham Field at the time) in Savannah, Georgia. First known as the 158th Fighter Squadron, it was equipped with the P-47 "Thunderbolt" aircraft, a powerful aircraft that saw unlimited action in WWII. Read full history below.
tabHistory of the 165th Airlift wing 
165th Airlift WingThe 165th Airlift Wing began its proud history on 12 October 1946 at Travis Field (Chatham Field at the time) in Savannah, Georgia. First known as the 158th Fighter Squadron, it was equipped with the P-47 "Thunderbolt" aircraft, a powerful aircraft that saw unlimited action in WWII. Within two years the 158th was one of the first units in the Air National Guard to receive the new jet fighters, the F-80C "Star". Regarded as one of the top units in the Air Guard, the 158th Fighter Squadron received the Spaatz Trophy for being the most outstanding Guard Fighter Squadron in the country in 1949.

In March 1949, the 158th moved to Hunter Field where it was based until called to active duty during the Korean Conflict on 10 October 1950. In November 1950, personnel reported to George Air Base, California, where they transitioned to F-84 "Thunderjets ". In 1951 the unit deployed to Misawa Air Base, Japan, where its mission was to provide air defense for the northern portion of Japan. While assigned in Japan, the squadron flew regularly to Korea to provide air support to allied forces. The 158th Fighter Squadron returned from Japan in 1952 and was released from active duty. The unit returned to Travis Field with P-51 fighters and it later received F-84D, F-84F, and F-86L jet aircraft.

Reorganization came in 1962 when the unit transitioned from a fighter mission to an airlift mission The 158th Fighter Squadron became 158th Air Transport Squadron assigned to the 165th Air Group. They performed worldwide airlift missions with new aircraft, the C-97 "Stratocruiser". In 1967 the huge C-124 "Globemaster" replaced the C-97.

On 8 August 1975, the first of the C-130E aircraft, aptly named "Hercules", came to the City of Savannah at the international airport to replace the older C-124's. While the C-124's were being retired from the Air Force inventory, the C-130's were arriving at the 165th Tactical Airlift Group. Currently, the unit now flies C-130H "Hercules" aircraft received directly from the Lockheed Factory during September and October 1981. On 15 April 1992, the unit was redesignated the 165th Airlift Group.

On 1 October 1995, the unit received its current designation, the 165th Airlift Wing.
tab165th Airlift Wing Hall of Commanders 
Col. Ralph G. Kuhn  Col. William F. Summerell  Col. Phillips D. Hamilton
 Col. Charles B. Culbertson  Col. James W. Buckley  Col. William P. Bland Jr.
 Col. Douglas M. Padgett Col. Scott A. Mikkelson   Col. John H. Oldfield Jr.
 Col. William N. Searcy  Col. Steven Westgate  Col. Thomas R. Moore
 Col. Henry A. Smart Jr.  Col. Jesse T. Simmons Jr.  
tab165 AW Aircraft History 
Aircraft History Collage
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 Inside the 165th AW

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tabHistory of the ANG
Air National Guard at 60: A HISTORY
tabAir National Guard: A Short Story
The Air National Guard as we know it today -- a separate reserve component of the United States Air Force -- was a product of the politics of postwar planning and interservice rivalry during World War II. The men who planned and maneuvered for an independent postwar Air Force during World War II didn't place much faith in the reserves, especially the state-dominated National Guard.

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